UCAT Score Calculator (2024 Update)

Updated on: December 3, 2023
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Written By Dr Ollie

Every article is fact-checked by a medical professional. However, inaccuracies may still persist.

Without a dedicated UCAT calculator, it’s very difficult to understand how the raw marks you might get in a UCAT mock would translate into a scaled score.

This calculator is designed to give you an estimate of exactly that.

It’s certainly not perfect, but I’ve calibrated it as best I could to give you accurate outputs for what your UCAT scaled score may have been if you got a set selection of raw marks in your actual UCAT exam.

UCAT Score Raw Mark Converter

Enter how many questions you got right in each section to calculate your estimated scaled score.

Verbal Reasoning Score
Decision Making Score
Quantitative Reasoning Score
Abstract Reasoning Score

Calculated Scores:
Verbal Reasoning: ?
Decision Making: ?
Quantitative Reasoning: ?
Abstract Reasoning: ?
Total:

Situational Judgement Band Calculator

Unlike the other sections in the UCAT, in the Situational Judgement section you’re given a banding, rather than a numerical score.

Enter how many questions you got right to calculate your estimated Situational Judgement band.




Band ?

How To Calculate Your UCAT Score From A Practice Test

When taking practice tests in the lead-up to your UCAT, it can be difficult to judge what your real scaled score is going to be by just looking at your practice test marks.

For one, it’s difficult to know if the practice tests are harder than the real UCAT.

You’ve got your raw marks, which are out of 44 for the Verbal Reasoning section or 29 for the Decision Making section as examples, and then you can convert these raw marks into percentages.

E.g. 81% correct in the Quantitative Reasoning section (29/36) or 88% correct in Abstract Reasoning (44/50).

However, none of these figures gives you a direct insight into the actual scaled score you’re going to be given when you get your UCAT results.

These scaled scores are a bit harder to calculate as they directly correlate to how well an average cohort of test takers does in the exam.

It’s not just a direct conversion chart for a certain raw mark to equal a certain scaled score.

There’s actually quite a lot of complicated statistics that goes into converting these scores into each other.

However, without access to the UCAT Consortium’s database on candidate performance, these more direct conversions are accurate enough to still give you an idea if you’re heading in the right direction with your preparation.

The easiest way to calculate your UCAT score from a practice test is to use the UCAT score calculators above.

You can then use this overall score to calculate your UCAT percentile to see how you’re doing compared to the average candidate.

Or, if you prefer, you can use the UCAT score conversion table below.

UCAT Score Conversion Table

These UCAT score conversion tables actually contain the exact same data as the UCAT score calculators above, but just laid out in table format.

You might find them slightly easier to use as you can scan across the rows rather than directly having to input different scores every time.

Estimated ScoreVerbal ReasoningDecision MakingQuantitative ReasoningAbstract Reasoning
3003332
3307454
3508576
37010688
400117910
4301281012
4501491114
47015101316
50017111518
53018121720
55020131922
57022142024
60023152126
63025162228
65027172330
67029182432
70031192534
73032202636
75033212738
77034222840
80036232942
83038243044
85039253246
87041273348
90044293650

As I mentioned above, the real UCAT doesn’t use a table like this one to calculate your final scores.

However, although the actual UCAT will use a lot more complicated maths, I think it is still interesting to see scaled score estimate tables laid out like this one.

For example, the Decision Making section only actually has 29 marks to play with, so there really can’t be that much variance in the scaled score conversion from this table.

Equally though, for the most part, I’ve used even divisions in raw marks translating to even divisions in scaled scores, apart from near the very top end of the score ranges.

You can see this most clearly in with the Abstract Reasoning section, that divided nicely into steps of 2 throughout the whole scaled score range.

But, in reality, these divisions will be smaller around the scores that most people land at (for Abstract Reasoning this tends to be an average of about 645).

This is one of the main inaccuracies of using tables like the one above, but despite these limitations, I do still think they can provide value above and beyond just looking at your raw marks.

UCAT Situational Judgement Conversion Table

Just as above, you can estimate your Situational Judgement band from your raw marks.

This conversion table contains the mark ranges that I programmed into the Situational Judgement score calculator above.

Estimated BandSituational Judgement Score
Band 154-66
Band 244-53
Band 334-43
Band 40-33

Situational Judgement is a bit of a trickier section to convert because I think there can be a wider variation in question difficulty leading to bigger differences in how many out of the 66 marks on your practice test you may get.

If everyone found that year’s Situational Judgement questions to be really difficult, then the raw mark boundary needed to get a Band 1 or Band 2 will be lower.

How To Interpret Your UCAT Score

If you’re just starting out in your UCAT preparation journey, your exact score shouldn’t matter too much.

The important thing is that it’s progressively getting higher as you revise.

As you draw closer to your exam date however, you may want to get a more accurate picture of where you’re at.

Any UCAT score you get from practice questions is never going to be exactly what you get on test day.

This is because even the best preparation resources don’t quite exactly mirror the official exam.

The closest you’ll get is from one of the official UCAT mocks. Which is why I always recommend saving at least one for the final few days before your test.

When looking at your UCAT score, it’s important to remember that most universities consider it as a whole- so it’s not a complete disaster if you’ve got one particularly weak section as you can more than make up for it in the others.

To calculate your overall UCAT score, you just need to take your “Total” score from the calculator above and times it by 4.

Additionally, how important your UCAT score is to your chances of getting into medical school totally depends on where you choose to apply.

Final Thoughts

When preparing, I’d try not to get too caught up on the exact scaled score estimates from your mocks, as they’re never going to be completely accurate.

Rather, I’d focus on the more general trends of improvement you should be seeing and using them to identify weaker areas that you can target in your revision.

Use the UCAT score calculator to better analyse your results, but don’t rely on it as a direct reflection of what your real score will be.

About the author
After studying medicine at the University of Leicester, Dr Ollie now works as a junior doctor in London. His interests include medical education and expedition medicine, as well as having a strong belief in the importance of widening access to medicine.